Ewe and I

I spent the day yesterday at a wonderful new-to-me yarn shop in Chehalis with my fiber friends – Ewe and I.

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It is both yarn shop and cafe, so we used it as our landing spot and drank many cups of tea while we split off in small groups to check out other nearby businesses.

I highly recommend the Sisters quilting store as well.  Maybe wear sunglasses – the fabric is bright!

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So much Kaffe Fassett.  The choices were mind boggling.

Lunch back at the yarn store was as lovely as the fiber choices.

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Definitely a town to return to.  It is already on the calendar.

Pointy elbows

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For some reason my husband has lately been drilling holes in the elbow of his dress shirts. Only on the right sleeve. He must be in the habit of leaning on that arm on his desk. So today I’m cutting up shirts because I can’t bear to waste all that cotton.

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It appears to be addicting because I’ve also got into my closet and found some shirts that I don’t wear anymore because of stains I couldn’t get out and started in on them as well. I really am going to have to start sewing again one of these days and actually use this fabric.

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Power tools

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Lately my crafting has involved saws rather than sewing machines.

We’ve spent the last month having our yards, front and back, totally redone.  New patios and paths, and a multitude of new plantings.  It was all finished just in time for it to be too cold and wet to really be useable.

For most of it we threw money at people to do the work.  But I wanted to put some effort in, beyond the plant buying, so we are making the various privacy screens ourselves.  (Not the posts, though.  That was another task we farmed out to the people with muscles and stamina and post hole diggers.)

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The people at Lowe’s got us started with the cedar fence boards, cutting the 5 1/2” boards into 2” and 3 1/2” boards.

We then stained them what was supposed to be a neutral sort of pale brown but turned out to be very orange.  I also didn’t think there was enough difference in size between the two boards.  So, back to Lowe’s for more boards, colorless stain, and a second attempt.  This time I ripped the boards myself, using uncut 5 1/2” boards and making ~1 3/4” boards.

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This is the new privacy screen around our window in the back.  Too pale?  I didn’t find the right brown yet I guess, but at least it isn’t orange.   It still needs trim on the edges and the post tops cut off, but I’m happy with it.  There is a star jasmine and a climbing rose which will be trained up it on both sides to make it even more private.

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The second one we finished today, except again for the post cutting.  I figured the orange boards didn’t matter as much in the front where I won’t be sitting in a patio chair staring at them, so we used those we’d already stained for the screen around the garbage cans.

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My son “helping” during the photo shoot, in between holding boards for me to screw into the posts and sweeping up sawdust.

We have an 8’ wide screen to build on the property line so our neighbor won’t have to stare at our trailer, the screens where the hot tub will eventually go, and a small screen blocking the view of our air conditioner still to go, but we’ve worked out the kinks in the method, so they should go quickly if the weather holds out this week.

 

 

Staying mobile

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In my new high school we don’t have assigned classrooms.  We divvy up the rooms depending on the activities and how much space we need.  This means we keep everything back in the team office and cart what we need to the rooms and then clear it all back out again at the end of the classes.

It has proved a little challenging for me.  I am constantly running back for a white board eraser or a set of papers or my textbook copy. Sometimes I remember everything but it takes a couple trips to get it all there.

So today I made a small tote with lots of internal pockets that will be my classroom kit. There are slots for markers, pens and pencils, scissors, laptop charger, my phone and some as yet unidentified extras.  It is wide enough for file folders and deep enough for the textbook.  Nothing will be left behind!

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I quilted the outside and then fused interfacing to the lining to add even more structure.  The pockets are tubes that I divided into various widths when I attached it to the lining.

Turning it inside out through the lining opening is my favorite part.  It is like the big reveal on the HGTV shows.

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The handles are canvas that I folded and then folded again so it is four thicknesses.  When I did the edge top stitching my smaller  machine had some trouble going through all that canvas, the interfacing, and the quilted material.  I had to rip it out because the bobbin thread acted up and got all loopy.  I switched to my heavier Juki machine and it all smoothed out.  That thing can punch through anything I put it to!

I haven’t loaded it up yet, but I think it is going to be just the right size and save me a lot of running back and forth.

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Falling leaves

So much fun yesterday,

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I got together with my usual fiber gang yesterday, and we spent the day turning leaves and silk into beautiful combinations.

Seattle Leslie had taken a class in using leaves to print on silk scarves so she led us in techniques throughout the day. Everything began with a big pile of vegetation gathered from various neighborhoods, both green and dried.

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There were also a lot of onion skins to add yellow and orange options. The dry leaves were soaked in water so they would be less brittle and could handle the process.

First the scarves had to be soaked in a heated alum solution and then wrung out gently.   After that there were various options. The leaves dipped in an iron water solution could just be directly laid on the scarf and wrapped up, or cotton blankets (sheet strips) with dye could be laid on top, with or without more iron water.  Stems and flowers?  Why not.  Rusty washers?  Toss them in!

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The scarves and Saran Wrap were tightly rolled around plastic and wood dowels and tied tightly to keep the cloth in close contact with the leaves.

Some of us really put themselves into getting that part right.

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Then the bundles all went into this fabulous old steamer Oregon Leslie found on Craig’s List.  It was originally for canning, but it makes a perfect scarf steamer.

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The unwrapping, after the bundles had cooled, was magical.  So many unexpected results!

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The scarf above, made on a wool/silk fabric, came out really yellow compared to all the others.  Less heat perhaps, as it went in as one of the later bundles?  But the red Japanese maple leaves with all the yellow are gorgeous.

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We learned that chestnut and oak leaves left wonderful imprints, as did smoke tree leaves.  Cedar and fir left ghostly jagged lines, and onion skin gave sharp burst or yellow and orange.  Hydrangea leaves, on the other hand, didn’t give much of an effect at all.

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Bundle after bundle unrolled incredible prints.

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The joy just keep coming.

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Some were even more joyful than others.

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Can’t wait to do it again!

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A quick trip north

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I went up to Seattle recently to craft with my cousin, Patti.  She had an almost finished fused fabric project that needed a couple of sewing details, so I brought my machine along.

What I didn’t bring was the power cord.  Argh!  Luckily, Seattle Leslie (as distinguished from Oregon Leslie in our fiber group) was willing to text her husband from her trip to the Midwest and he got out her spare machine to lend us.  Sewing can be a complicated multi-state business.

My cousin is generally a paper crafter, but occasionally she gets the hankering for fabric and floss.  Along with (parts of) my sewing machine, I lugged up bags of floss and batiks and WonderUnder fusing.

 

I stitched around some fused pieces of her camping scene that were losing their stick, and she added embroidery details – little clumps of grass, chains to hold up the hammock, French knot sparks in the fire.  I would love to have that camping spot!

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I fused some small geometric shapes and started connecting them with stitching, when I wasn’t knitting or walking their labradoodle – a dog so laid back that when it slowly wags its tail everyone around him takes note of how excited Teddy is.  Teddy is the chilled out dude of the dog world.  Our dog is a neurotic hyper wired mess in comparison.

Teddy in his usual mood:

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Now Patti is moving on to little houses.  She got a few embroidery books and websites to learn new stitches and at this rate She’s going to be stashing fabric soon I’m sure.  Fiber hobbies are addictive.

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