Finished scarf

39F4A947-BA20-4496-B69D-884558008A4C

I finished my woven scarf and am declaring it a success.

You can read about the set up for this project in this post.

0acd69c6-1a6d-4142-aba6-91dc8b32107d-e1555887425167.jpeg

I wove until I was having to fight to get the stick shuttle through the shed — the top and bottom of the warp get too close together to pass through smoothly, particularly with the mess of criss-crossing strands caused by using a variety of different yarns and spacing them randomly along the heddle.  When I weave with just one yarn I can be tidier and weave much closer to the end before I have to stop.

7329183B-3F01-4A2E-B19A-2543F6E98C13

Because the strands at towards the ends tend to resist moving up and down, especially the “stickier” alpaca yarn, I had to be vigilant to make sure I wasn’t skipping over (or under) any threads I shouldn’t have.  You can see in the picture above that I missed in one place.  The weft is going over three warp threads, when it should be under the middle thread.

761179D6-6E8F-4EA0-A4E8-1789BEBB95EA

This was very close to the end of my weaving, so I just cut the warp thread, pulled it back through to the spot I missed, and then wove it in properly with a tapestry needle.

8ADEB3A7-C1B1-4763-951C-7F95264202A4

Then I cut the rest of the warp threads loose and pulled them out of the heddle.

398A00F8-4BFC-4CE4-BD77-C17F9E97C80B

Knots keep the whole thing from unraveling — every five stands together keeps things in place and makes a nice fringe.

18863F6E-0DA8-4EEE-9B18-E9F172C81474

The finished scarf is a little rough and bumpy, so the next step is to even that out.

8629F0C9-11CC-4389-8349-1BA07E6AD9BD

A good sloshing soak relaxes the yarns and smooths out the tension.

7CD413DD-BDA3-4BE5-8C54-4DF1BAE5677F

Some time drying in a slight breeze, a trim to even out the fringe, and I have a new scarf to put into the gift drawer.

 

 

 

Reviving an old hobby

I dragged my rigid heddle loom out from under the bed, dusted it off, and got it warped this afternoon.   It has been several years since I’ve used my loom, so it took a while to dig out all the parts I needed.

To get the intended scarf long enough, I had to move the dining room table into the kitchen so I could put the direct warping peg on the kitchen counter.  I’m going to need a new plan for the future as that was rather a pain.

984A3250-A5C6-4976-BD37-2618FC82CC6F

For the warp I used a number of different fingering weight remnants from various knitting projects.

63AE7CE1-E92F-4D3E-B1A9-C14DD6E08BD8

The weft is going to be from a cone of untwisted plies I bought years ago.

8D102298-7020-4CAE-AB1B-3621864DBEE1

It took a little while to remember the steps, but it came back to me.  After warping, the yarn is wound up onto the back.

 

5F9ED2A9-1034-44D2-8D3E-27AB87EEC41B

Then pulling single strands through the small holes on the heddle.

7E14B9DF-EEF3-4538-84B9-A696D18188EE

Knotting in bunches.

C6E4CCDB-5E2A-423B-96DF-0C07A8B6FB51

Lacing to get even(ish) tension.

5C8F34D7-ED16-44E9-8488-8FA4ED1F9612

And finally, weaving!

Starting with thicker waste yarn helps space out the warp and gives me a further chance to correct any strands with loose tension.  The warping took an hour or so, but then the weaving goes very quickly.  Knitting a scarf with this yarn would take many days.  I can weave a scarf in a few hours.  And it is a great way to burn up some of the yarn stash.

44DFBC00-C0C1-4025-9A14-FBADAAD0185F

 

 

First finish of 2019

Welcome 2019!  Asking, nay pleading – please don’t have all the crazy of 2018.  We need some calm and sanity to even it out.

My Dress no. 2 obsession (compulsion?) continues into the new year as I finished two more flannel tunics, bringing the number of work wear tunics to ten.

C3C1E957-6A4D-4DC4-8606-0A1DDC565973

These are both from Robert Kaufman Mammoth flannel, the same fabric as my gold and gray check.  I loved that first one because it is thick and warm, important in the winter in my library as all the heat goes up to the open second story, leaving none for the people far below.

This one got back ties.

110F6588-EA5C-48AE-AFD4-D37B419C7694

All the plaid may be a bit lumberjack, but I will be warm and comfortable, and the red and black are my school’s colors so I’m set for spirit days.  And hey, I live in the Pacific Northwest.  We live for plaid flannel. It goes with our Birkenstocks-and-socks.

I screwed up a bit on the blue and gray version.  I was so eager to cut into the fabric that I forgot all about matching the lines on the side seams.  I realized it as soon as I finished cutting out the body pieces, sadly too late to do anything about it.  I was more careful cutting the red and black.

My plan is to pause on these now that I have two weeks of work days worth now, but who knows when the need for just one more will strike?

I had long strips of left over fabric so I ran a narrow hem up each edge and made two long scarves.  I can spend some TV time pulling strings from the end to fringe them.

FCB83DEA-2DBA-4135-9DD6-9A042F381630

image

Wishing you all a warm, healthy, happy new year.

 

Summer progress

41F74891-CAD6-4C1D-BCA9-F7D9C6F1F5A0

Finally on summer vacation!  And then I made the mistake of watering all the new plants in the garden, and a sudden rain storm blew in.  My fault – I should have know better than to temp the rain gods like that.

But it made for a lot of available sewing time.  I’m back at work on the Growing Up Odd quilt, chain stitching the little squares and building the different sized blocks.

D6118CAE-B8F2-49FD-AC3F-1124AF44F300

I’ve finished the 7×3 and 7×7 blocks, 16 of each, and I have 34 of the 48 3×3 blocks done.

I tried hard to not duplicate fabrics in the same blocks.  That was easy in the nine patches, but harder when it was a 49 square block, sewn together randomly in chunks.  There is usually at least one repeat.

58F5C5D1-9A04-4874-9712-AF04F0F1FF35

Sashing next.  I’m planning to quilt it in strips to make it more manageable, though the actual quilting will have to wait until I get my Juki back from the shop.  My smaller Brother machine is great for regular sewing, but it doesn’t like too much bulk under the needle.

I also finished up my ribbed scarf knit with a variety of coned yarns.  I’m trying to clear up space in the craft storage.  It is entirely 1×1 ribbing, so it made a great work project I could pick up during lunch or faculty meetings.  No pattern or thought needed.

While I was knitting it the yarns were thin and almost cotton like – coned yarns still have oil on them as they were meant to be used on machines – but once it was done and hand washed in hot, soapy waters, and then dried on the hammock, the yarn softened and bloomed. Definitely a cold weather accessory, so it will be put away for awhile.

Getting away

B75B7BEC-C93B-4312-B13A-2EA3B91E8C5A

Another fiber friends weekend has flashed past.  This time we met up halfway between the northern people and the southern people, at an Air BnB house in Olympia.  Tucked into a quiet little neighborhood we sewed and spun and knit and played with fiber.  Also, there was wine.  🙂

I cut out and sewed most of three more tunics based on the Dress No. 2 pattern.  I got as far as the neck bands before I broke the sewing machine needle on a misplaced pin and had to stop.  But look at this book card fabric I found!  Perfect for my job as a high school librarian.

Leslie 1 (50% of the group is named Leslie) brought her blending board and showed us how to make rolags, which you need if you want to spin in true woolen fashion.  And it makes it really easy to mix up colors and fiber types.  There is cotton, wool, angora, and alpaca in those sample rolls.

I added another big chunk to my 1×1 ribbed stash-eating scarf.  I’m holding three strands together for a marled effect.

63B8EE32-0498-419B-937F-D0974A149D1B

There was knitting in public, which greatly intrigued the wait staff at the Three Magnets Brewing Co. when we ventured out of the house in search of cold drinks on a very hot day.

20180512_164433

Look at all the handspun my friend Paige has created and accumulated! This is just the fraction I could fit in the photo.

689260BE-2F86-42A3-B423-D71D25E9BC13

I tremendously enjoy each of these weekend getaways.  Like minded people laughing together, plus fiber.  How can that not be great?

 

Knitting down the stash

83D684C8-F278-4D01-A0E5-D67F97ECAB9B

A few years ago I went through a Colourmart stage where I bought a lot of coned yarns of various types.  I made some lovely projects, but still ended up with a couple of bins of cones that have been sitting around waiting for inspiration.

EE2981DB-32FC-425B-B77A-58A2136389DA

With the intent of creating space where is now none, I grabbed some of the half full cones with thinner yarns and cast on with three of them held together for a 1×1 ribbing.  When one cone runs out I will add in another and just let the colors change.

These cones yarns still have the spinning oil on them, so when it is finished and washed in hot water the yarns will soften and expand.  And my available storage space will expand as well.